Recently I’ve heard of a particular firm in the Australian exhibition industry who aggressively targets prospects by calling them up and offering them to cut the cost of doing tradeshows with their current provider by at least 30%. Now while this is one type of approach to get clients by offering the cheapest possible price it also highlights the confusion and uncertainty around what an actual tradeshow stand should cost. How are prices determined?  Do I have a giant lotto style contraption that I pull random numbers out of?  Do I just like the figure $78,690? Do I just charge what I think I can get away with? Apart from the lotto device the answer is, no.

In all my 20+ years of being in the trade show industry I have never seen a quote that lists every single component that is required to deliver a trade show stand. Truly, to list each and every item on a quote would melt your mind! It’s like listing the ingredient of marshmellows, sometimes, you are better off not knowing.  But in the interest of opening the kimono (ooooh, settle) listed below are items that commonly get used on a trade show stand and that are factored into the quote prepared by your tradeshow provider. By no means is this an exhaustive list and as soon as I press published on this blog I’m sure I will think of more, but it is a good starting point to pull back the curtain and reveal what you are paying for:

  • 3-D renderings
  • Working and detailed drawings of cabinetry /constructed items
  • Layouts showing positioning of graphics on the stand
  • Project management including client liaison, meetings with all key stakeholders, sourcing of materials and selection of finishes, liaising with suppliers including face-to-face meetings to work through issues around stand construction and setting up of all documentation, timelines, quote requests, OH&S manuals, orders, and on-site manuals
  • Insurances including public liability, professional indemnity, workers compensations, business insurance
  • Wages / consultancy fees of your trade show partner
  • Your trade show partner’s overheads in running a business ie. rent / utilities / business machines, consumables
  • Cake (not kidding)
  • Flooring
  • Walling
  • Reception counters
  • Workstations and demo bases
  • Specification panels
  • Printed mural graphics, light box transparencies, promo graphics, taglines, messaging, logos, feature graphics
  • Showcases
  • Catering
  • Discussion areas
  • Furniture
  • My pony Buttercup (might be kidding)
  • Meeting rooms
  • Storage facilities
  • Overhead rigging
  • Overhead banners
  • Arm lights, LED Cove lighting, like boxes, specialist lighting techniques, go those, projected imagery,
  • Monitor screens, computers and peripherals, touchscreens, tablets, LCD screens, and tiles, backlit projection, forward projection,
  • Immersive technology, interactive technology,
  • Power, water, compressed air
  • Forklift, scissor lift, plant hire
  • My electric guitar lessons so I can play in the Foo Fighters (ok, kidding)
  • Transport of all items to and from venue
  • Installation and dismantling of all items
  • Cleaning and preparation of stand
  • Photography of stand
  • On stand events
  • Storage of crating whilst show is on
  • Parking at venue
  • Handover of stand to client including any airfares, accommodation and travel fees
  • Writing of stand operation document
  • Post-show report
  • Finalisation of invoicing
  • Compilation of files for client to use in-house and on social media

Okay so while not all tradeshow stand would have every element that is listed above, many would and you can start to see how much is actually involved with each and every trade show stand.  There is probably a very good reason now that many clients look at a quote and think “Holy cats, I could build a HOUSE for that!”  Because yeah, in a lots of ways you are building a house.  A temporary one, but a house with all the trimmings nonetheless.

The pricing of the trade show stand is never just about the dollar cost though. It is also about the value. The murky thing is: value is not easily quantified. Because it means something different to each and every person. For example I love buying products from Mecca Cosmetica. I love being fussed over, I love free offers to try new products, I love being invited to the VIP days where world renowned make-up artists trying convince me that I really can wear strong red lip. I fully understand that I’m paying more than I would if I was buying similar products on strawberrynet.com but for me, the value I get from buying my products direct from Mecca means so much more than a cheap price to me.

And so it goes with trade show stands.

Making decisions around the price you put on value can be answered by this: how well do you want to be take care of during the whole entire process of organising a trade show stand? Do you want to pay for the first class experience of a total turn-key solution where you simply turn up on the day unfussed and stress-free having relied on your trade show provider to handle each and every detail with care?  Or are you prepared to sacrifice this red carpet service to save some coin, work overtime to do things yourself in an industry you only barely understand so you turn up on show day harried and OVER IT?

This stand cost less than $10K to do!

This stand cost less than $10K to do!

Anyone can give you a cheap price for a stand and I can promise you now that the cheap price is also applicable to the cheap service, the casual attitude towards really understanding the needs and objectives of their clients, and the total lack of addressing any issues raised either during the preshow or on-site build up. The all-important value comes in when you deal with people who truly love what they do, who continue to educate themselves in all things tradeshows and marketing, who can offer sound advice and steer their clients away from making costly mistakes, who can be on-call, that can offer alternatives, who will be responsive, and will treat you as their only client. Now while not every company wants to pay for that top level service or may even see no value in all those extras it certainly does make a difference to the success of your trade show and obtaining the all-important return on investment.

This stand cost close to $1million dollars to produce!

This stand cost close to $1million dollars to produce!

Price should always be a factor in determining the trade show provider you partner with BUT their ability to provide added value should also be considered equally. If your provider is only ever competing on price, their business model is on shaky ground because there will always be another company that can do it at a cheaper price. Rarer are those trade show providers that can actually deliver so much mind-bending value that they end up making price irrelevant. And you want to seek out these firms because they make an effort to understand your company, will nail your show objectives, show you how to get the best return on your investment, do what they say they will do and are just damn good people to work with.

Speaking of the red lip that I envy but can’t seem to pull off I’d like to share with you this great track from a lady that knows a thing or two about the power of the pout.  And how to shred a guitar in heels.

See you next week!